Types of lighting for the home

You probably don’t think buying a lighting fixture for a room is all that complicated. It isn’t. However, it does require you to consider which types of lighting you may need. According to the Lighting Association, there are three types:

1. General lighting. By far the most common, this is the type of lighting that is designed to create a functional brightness that spreads throughout a room. A good example is a main ceiling light.

2. Task lighting. As the name implies, this type provides extra light needed for a specific task, such as working at a desk or chopping onions on a kitchen countertop. A bedside lamp used for reading is another example of task lighting.

3. Accent lighting. This type is designed to set off a particular feature of a room, such as a painting. It creates some practical light, but its main purpose is to add to the overall décor.

When choosing lighting for a room, it’s important to consider these three types. First, decide how best to light the space generally. Then think about any special lighting you might need for specific functions, such as reading. Finally, consider how accent lighting might add to the overall look. Have any questions, call: 613-857-5807

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Deciding on the discretionary move

Sometimes we don’t have much choice about selling our home and buying another. Circumstances, such as a job relocation, may have made that choice for us.

However, most often the decision to move is discretionary. Sometimes people move simply because they think it’s a good idea. They feel that “now” is the right time to find their next dream home.

So how do you make that kind of decision?

There are, of course, many reasons to make a discretionary move. Usually, those reasons fall into one of two categories: need and want.

You may need to find a new home, for example, because you’ve outgrown your current property. Perhaps you have a growing family and require more space. Maybe you’re doing more entertaining and need a larger backyard with a more spacious deck. It could be that the commute to work is arduous and you need to move to a place that’s closer.

Those “needs” may motivate you to move, but sometimes a “want” plays an important role, too.

For example, you may want to live in a quieter neighbourhood or in a newly built home that requires less maintenance. Maybe you simply want a change.

If you’re thinking of making a move, take a moment to write down a list of your needs and wants. Seeing them on paper will help make the decision easier.

Looking for expert help? Call today. 613-853-5807

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Avoiding unwelcome guests

There are unwelcome guests that most homeowners dread. They come into your house, eat, sleep, make a mess, and never leave willingly. Each one has at least six legs and sometimes flies.

They are, of course, insects. They’ve been freeloading in homes since homes were invented. Here are some practical ways to keep these unwelcome guests out:

  • Find out how they got in. Look for gaps around windows and doors, and cracks in the basement. If you find a spider web, there’s likely an insect entryway nearby.
  • Watch out for standing water near the foundation of your home. Make sure rain gutters drain water well away.
  • Eliminate clutter. Insects love warm, cluttered, moist areas.
  • Check the seal around dryer vents and other vents, pipes and cable wires going through the wall. Reseal if necessary.
  • Rinse recyclables before putting them into a bag or bin. Few things are more tempting to a bug than the dark, moist, sweet insides of an un-rinsed pop can.

If you do end up with a serious insect or mouse problems, call a professional exterminator.

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Your home at a glance

Have you ever driven up to a restaurant and your first impression was disappointing? Perhaps the windows looked dark and gloomy, the façade was worn and unattractive or for some other reason it just didn’t look like a tempting place to eat.

It could still be a fantastic restaurant – a real gem. But, your first impression has soured your anticipation. If you still walk through the front door, it will likely be with the expectation of being disappointed.

This scenario often plays out in the real estate market as well.

A buyer drives up to a home for sale and quickly forms an impression based on what he sees “from the curb”. That’s why you’ll hear real estate experts talk about the importance of “curb appeal”. It’s one of the most important selling points of a property.

If you plan to put your home on the market, you obviously want your home to look as attractive as possible from the street. Fortunately, there are many simple things you can do to improve curb appeal.

For example, you can trim shrubs and hedges, plant flowers, clean the walkway and driveway, paint the front door and garage door, and clean the exteriors of the windows. All these projects are relatively easy and inexpensive. Yet, each can make a dramatic improvement to how your home looks at first glance.

Don’t be like the great restaurant that’s hidden behind an unkept façade. Make sure your curb appeal reflects the overall value of your property.

Looking for more advice on selling your home quickly and for the best price? Call today. 613-853-5807

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Thinking of updating your bathroom!

Bathroom or powder room make overs can be done to accommodate most budgets. They don’t have to blow the bank.

I have attached a link to an article that goes through bathroom renovations from complete make overs to modest updates.

In the article, the lower cost range shows a minimum cost of $6,000. That is the one area I don’t agree. You can pick up quality vanities, lighting, faucets, floor tiles and toilets and have them installed for less. It is very important to shop around, and take advantage of sales!

If you have questions or would like more information about bathrooms or something else, please let me know. I would be happy to get the information for you.

Perhaps you are thinking of updating your home in preparation to sell it. I would be happy to provide some feedback as to what would give you the best return on your investment.

http://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/bathrooms/remodel-a-bathroom/

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Don’t take stair safety for granted

The first known use of stairs was in ancient Egypt during the building of the pyramids. Chances are, some workers back then tripped and fell on them. Some 3,000 years later, injuries on stairs are still a big problem.

According to the Centre for Occupational Health & Safety, the insurance cost of injuries from falls on stairs is second only to automobile accidents! Clearly, it’s a bigger problem than most people imagine.

So how do you prevent trips, falls and other mishaps on stairs?

The most common way is to use handrails. In fact, most trips and falls occur when people aren’t able to regain their balance because they are not holding a handrail.

Another source of accidents are items, such as toys, left on stairs. Some people have the bad habit of using stairs as a temporary shelf for books, magazines, mail and other items. That’s not a good idea!

Always be careful when carrying heavy items on stairs. Even an overloaded laundry basket can be a hazard. If it’s too heavy or you can’t see over the top, it’s too full.

A lot of this is common sense. However, because injuries on stairs are so prevalent, we need to use our common sense more often. Especially when there are children or seniors in the home or visiting.

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steve@stevesicard,ca

http://www.stevesicard.ca

You don’t notice it – but most buyers will!

Imagine you’re viewing a potential new home. You walk in the front door and are instantly impressed. You explore the property room by room and like what you see. 

Then there’s something you notice that’s not quite right. An odour. You realize that it’s likely cat dander and, now that you’ve identified it, you smell it everywhere. Suddenly the home doesn’t seem as attractive as it did just moments earlier. 

The owner of the property is probably so used to the smell that he doesn’t even notice it. Neither does anyone else in the household. 

So, when marketing your home for sale, be scent sensitive. Think about the odours that you may have become used to but others are likely to notice. Even odours you think are pleasant, like the strong scent given off by some house plants, may not be pleasing to everyone. 

An odour can easily distract a buyer from appreciating the good qualities of your property. Pay particular attention to garbage bins (which can smell even when empty), pets, kitty litter (even when fresh and unused), the kitchen (especially after cooking), perfumes, and closets. 

The smell of cigarette smoke is particularly unpleasant to many people. Its odour can linger even on an outside deck or patio. 

Bottom line? Don’t assume buyers won’t notice certain smells. They will. 

Looking for more advice on selling your home quickly and for the best price? Call or email today. 613-853-5807, steve@stevesicard.ca

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